It’s been a busy week, trying to get as much material together for this new venture as possible! A quick word about what we’ll be putting onto this website. I’ll be blogging once a week, but watch out for our guest posts; whilst Laura will be tweeting and managing our Facebook presence. Keep sending in your ideas about what we can discuss in our Top Ten Tips feature, and email in your stories so we can put together a case study to help other viewers.

Also, a big ‘thank you’ to My Heritage who are supporting this venture; I’ve been impressed with their approach to personal archiving, and as well as helping get Family History Show off the ground, they are also kindly assisting with an education pilot that’s running in a number of schools across the country, called Making History and run by the actor Colin McFarlane. Some amazing stories emerging from the work of these enthusiastic students (aged 8-18)…

We’re still building additional features to the site. A few suggestions have come in for a resource list, linked to the Top Ten Tips – working on it! We are also exploring an online shop, where you can get selected materials and publications to help you with your research.

Royal Marine MuseumWe hope you like the Dan Cruickshank interview. It was great fun to film. I’ve known Dan for the best part of 15 years, and it was tremendously kind of him to give up his time to share his passion for old home movies. The idea to view the films he’d collected appeared as a tentative suggestion, and our cameraman Seb knew of a little shop in Hackney that might have the right projectors. We all jumped in a cab, and we held our breath as Umit looked at the film that contained grainy images of Mickey Mouse…  Could it be a lost classic worth thousands of pounds? The results of our impromptu viewing are well worth a watch, if you haven’t seen it already.

I’ve been continuing to work on the history of Greater London (this will be a weekly feature until all the chapters are finally delivered to my publisher Nigel, who  is simply the nicest and most patient man in the world) as well as running around the country talking to county archives, extolling the virtues of ancestral tourism as a way forward whilst exploring collaborative opportunities for family history societies, voluntary groups like FreeBMD / FreeCEN / FreeREG, and county archives to transcribe document content whilst permitting commercial companies to charge subscribers to view the actual images that they have digitised (unless a free digitisation agency appears that can cope with the sheer amount of work, although there has already been one such offer that’s being investigated at the moment). This is a thorny issue, as there is no standard model across the country – but ‘best practice’ that keeps all parties happy will gradually emerge.

I’m looking forward to a visit to the Royal Marine museum next week, and then a catch up with the Ancestral Tourism Partnership in Nottingham on 25 November. So it’s all go this end, and no rest in site with Christmas beginning to loom on the horizon.

Cheers
Nick

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